Peppa Pig Saves the Day

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For weeks we struggled with Sonya’s persistent desire to remove her CIs. Nothing seemed to work. Nothing, that is, until in desperation we turned on our computer and let her watch Peppa Pig on YouTube. Sonya was immediately transfixed. Maybe it was the bright colors, the cheeky anthropomorphic animals, or the simple drawings. It might have had to do with the fact that one of Sonya’s first toys was a stuffed Peppa Pig doll. Whatever it was, Sonya wanted to hear this show. She pointed to her ears and sat still so that I could put her processors behind them.

This approach has worked 100 percent of the time. Even better is the fact that she is taking her processors off less often.

Our speech therapists have rallied behind this development. We incorporate Peppa and her family into speech therapy. Using a Melissa & Doug Wooden Doorbell House, we place a member of Peppa’s family inside each of the four doors. From there, Sonya must say “Hi Peppa Pig” or “Hi Mummy Pig,” etc.

Though I am happy we found a solution, I was initially disappointed to find that videos were the key to keeping Sonya’s processors on. I felt like in some way I had failed her. That I was taking the easy way out. I didn’t even want to admit to it on this blog. I worry that I may have opened Pandora’s Box. Perhaps Sonya will realize that I have no Plan B and will simply take her CIs off whenever she is in the mood to just zone out and watch TV.

While we are not a family that has forbidden screen time, we have tried to limit it. We allow Sonya to watch TV for about 15 minutes in the morning before breakfast and when we are driving to therapy and back. I am trying to phase out mindless videos and focus on interactive iPad games such as Daniel Tiger, Peek-a-Boo Barn, Toddler JukeBox, and My Very Hungry Caterpillar instead. I think that most everything in moderation is okay, and that some screen time that serves a purpose is okay.

But I have decided to be less harsh on myself. I’ll cross the above bridge if/when I get to it. For now, the importance of her being connected to the world of sound outweighs the potential negative side-effects. Including the fact that the theme songs to Peppa Pig seems to be burned in my brain.

On the other hand, how adorable would it be if Sonya learned to speak with a British accent?!

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5 thoughts

  1. This isn’t too shocking Missy considering that the Peppa videos seem to have the same effect on mostly all children her age and older! First it’s Elmo,
    Then Thomas then Peppa! Our granddaughter
    Parker who’ll be 2 this week has just started loving
    all Peppa, doll, pajamas, train sets, etc.! And Lucas actually did develop a British accent watching Peppa
    and the gang and still used some of the British phrases and still watches Peppa and he’s almost 4! He said to his grandfather last year, “Granddad, just give it a go” while they were playing together! :))
    It’s an adorable show and teaches children cooperation, family and friend connections, and is quite sweet! Don’t be hard on yourself, it’s wonderful that Sonya is right on target with her enjoyment of Peppa! Btw, she is absolutely adorable! XOFran

    1. Thank you so much Fran! That definitely makes me feel better. Love the British accent. Can’t wait for Sonya, Nico and Lucas to become buddies in a couple weeks! Maybe they can watch it together? 🙂 xoxo

  2. I commented earlier and as I hit “Send” I noticed my email address was typed in incorrectly but it was too late. Fran Hill
    My email is below:

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